Thursday, August 17, 2017

From old to new: First Aid Kit


August 2017

Time to make: 1 hours
Boys Life "Slide of the Month"
Sept. 1951, page37
Original design: E.F.S











The last of the film can slides from Boys Life  (that I know of) is a quick reach when you need a band-aid. While it's no replacement for a full first aid kit, I can appreciate a handy place to grab something for small cuts. The original kit carries finger band-aids, a gauze pad, some first-aid tape...

An aluminum loop is pop riveted to the back and the cross is painted on with model paints.

A plastic film can version


My updated version uses an Altoid Smalls tin which I painted white with spray paint. The decal on the front was a picture I found and printed on my home printer to water slide decal paper.  The contents of this kit are as follows;
Band-Aids
gauze pad
Tylenol 
first aid tape



Friday, July 28, 2017

Slide of the Month - Backpacks


Scout Camp 2017

Time to carve: who cares it's Scout Camp

Location: Rotary Scout Reservation #rsrbsa

Finishing: at home 1.5 hour


Summer Camp is one of those times when time passes effortlessly and I can just let the whittling knife take me to the things hidden in the wood.

I brought a piece of  9 x 1 3/4 x 3/4 inch piece of scrape maple from another project with me to summer camp with the intent of making a slide while I was there. Well three slides later I present the Backpack series. The first was a design in the Feb. 1984 Boys Life  Slide of the Month ( page 68) by Bill Andrews and consists of the carved backpack and an attached dowel for the sleeping bag. I painted the typical khaki color of BSA backpacks of the time and yellow  to match  the trim in the picture.




The second was a design found on the Internet but I can no longer find it so I cant give you the link. Based on a 60s backpack (I think) a sleeping bag strapped to the top and tent on the bottom. Its carved from a single piece of wood








The third design is based on the pack I used as a Boy Scout and still have today. If I remember correctly, this pack was a present and purchased in the early 70's most likely at the Big N (anyone remember those stores?).  An external frame nylon workhorse that has seen many miles and outlasted many a pair of boots. A brown dome tent (bought in the 80s in first go round as a Scoutmaster) is secured under the top flap. My sleeping bag in a stuff bag is strapped underneath. The one other item of note is the Knox Cannon Trail Relay patch. This slide is also carved from one piece of wood.


All the backpacks were carved from maple, painted with craft paints, and given a couple of coats of Poly.


Friday, July 14, 2017

Preview Backpacks



Scout Camp 2017

Time to carve: who cares it Scout Camp

Location: Rotary Scout Reservation #rsrbsa

Finishing: TBD










Just a quick preview of a set of backpack slides coming up that are being carved right now while at summer camp with our Troop. Its being carved from a piece of maple I had from another project and you might notice I haven't  cut the slide off the stock yet. This allows for a good hand hold and keeps my hand away from the carving. This slide is one off the Internet and the author wasn't sure where he had found it. Another pack (not shown here) is a Bill Andrews "Slide of the Month" #boyslife from February 1984. The final pack is one of my own design and mimics the pack I use as a youth.


Saturday, July 1, 2017

Slide of the Month July - Apollo and LEM


July 2017

Time to design: 2 hours
Time to print: 2 hours (your times may vary
Finishing: 2 hour
Original design: Tinkercad
Original designer: xmbrst
Try it yourself: Mini Apollo Mission


Another in my 3d printed space series, the Apollo mission captured the imagination of many including myself. Today I find it even more impressive considering the computing power of both combine craft was less than a Timex wrist watch today. The fact we could go to the moon, land and return safely is testament to the thousands of folks dedicated to the mission and the astronauts who's quick thinking saved many a mission. For a great set of articles on Apollo 11 mission, check out the NASA webpage



I found a few designs out there but I liked xmbrst design because of the modifications he did to reinforce the LEM legs and to make the rocket nozzles solid which could have been a problem when printing. The funny part is when these were printed, I did have some issue with the Apollo capsule breaking loose when printing and the rocket nozzle on the service module was a bit deformed. Well since I was gluing the parts together, it really didn't matter to me that the capsule's heat shield did not print since you would not be able to see it. As to the rocket nozzle, I used a UV activated glue (like these) as filler and then shaped it with sandpaper.  All the parts were glued together using super glue and I drilled a couple of holes in the back for a wire loop.  I used paint pens and home printed water slide decals to detail the slide. 

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

From old to new: sewing kit



June 2017

Time to make: 1 hours
Boys Life "Slide of the Month"
Sept. 1965, page 64
Original design: Bill Poese









So continuing with the old film can slides here is a simple sewing kit than can be very helpful out on the trail for sewing up a button or a tent. The original design contained buttons, thread, needles, a paper ruler, safety pins, straight pins, a thimble, and a small jackknife.

The plastic film container version


My updated design uses an Altoids Smalls tin. I started by painting the outside white and when dry, I applied a water slide decal I had printed on a printer. Next I attached an aluminum loop to the tin using pop rivets


The contents are essentially the same but there are pre-threaded needles. I did leave out the knife because most Scouts have a jackknife with them or you could use (my dentist shutters) your teeth. I also left out the ruler because, well, who measures.


Friday, June 2, 2017

Slide of the Month June - Celtic Knot




May 2017

Time to set up: 5 days

Time to turn: 45 minutes

Finishing: 2 hours

Designs from: Dan Lecocq

Youtube:  Celtic Knot Pen









Inspired by another hobby, I thought turning a 4 ring Celtic Knot would make a great slide. I made the slide from red maple, white maple, and black walnut and turned it on a lathe. While I would suggest watching the youtube video for the setup, I'll try to describe it here.

I cut a piece of red maple 1.5 x 1.5 x 4 inches as the base wood of the slide. Next I cut some thin pieces of white maple (about 1/16 inch thick) and black walnut (about 1/8 inch thick). I glued the thin strips together, white maple- black walnut-white maple, with some wood glue, clamped the whole length of the sandwiched wood and let it dry overnight. The next day I cut the sandwiched wood 1.5 inch strips. Going back to the red maple, I next labeled each side, with a pencil, the first side with a 1, 2 on the opposite side, 3 to the right side of the first side, and 4 to the left side of the first side. Setting up my table saw with a 30 degree tilt and fence at 1 inch from the blade. The height of the blade was set so the was just a 1/4 inch left after the cut. I moved the fence just a bit so the slot was the width of the sandwiched wood. Using some wood glue, I glued the sandwiched wood into the slot, cut off the excess, clamped and left it overnight to dry. The following day I repeated the cut, gluing, and clamping on side 2. The process was repeated for sides 3 and 4. Twenty-four hours after the final glue up, its time to turn the slide.

While it looks very square and nothing like interconnecting rings, rounding the piece brought the rings out in wonderful spender. When I got the piece to the diameter I wanted, I cut a V cut on ether side of the finish length (approximately 2 inches).  Still on the lathe, I sanded the piece down using some very fine sandpaper. Using a finishing method I learned from pen making, I applied several layers of super glue wet sanding between layers.

Removing it from the lathe, I drilled a 3/4 inch hole down the length of the piece and then carefully cut the slide to size using the V cuts as a guide. Finally I coated the inside of the slide with additional super glue.

Friday, May 12, 2017

Slide of the Month May - Project Gemini


May 2017

Time to design: 2 hours
Time to print: 2 hours (your times may vary Finishing: 1 hour
Original design: autocad123
Original designer: unknown
Try it yourself: Gemini capsule slide

 
Another slide you can 3D print and paint! Fascinated by the space race as a kid, I watched every launch I could. Project Gemini was a test platform for testing many of the things and maneuvers, like docking,  that would be needed in our quest to land a man on the moon.  It was nicknamed the "Gusmobile"  by fellow astronauts because of Gus Grissom  deep involvement in its design. The design was so versatile and dependable there was going to be a Gemini-B and Big G versions.  The  Gemini-B version that was going to be used by the Air Force for a planned a Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL). (Great documentary on it called Astrospies on PBS)




The Big G was to be an extended version of the Gemini-B that would carry 9 man missions

I believe I found the original out at autocad123 and I brought it into tinkercad to scale and modify. (Note: The ring is kind of thin and you might want to enlarge the thickness a bit.) When done with my modifications, the project was imported into Cura to convert it into a printable file with the Ultramaker 2 printer at my local library,  Berkshire Athenaeum, to print. When done priniting, I cleaned up the model with a sharp knife and sandpaper. I painted the model with some white and black spray paint and detailed the windows with paint pens. The lettering and flag where done using water slide paper and a printer.